Category Archives: Off-Topic

Battle for the Net (please read!)

This is off our usual topic, but U.S. readers especially, please read on.

The FCC wants to eliminate net neutrality, the principle that ISPs should treat all traffic the same, and not block, throttle, or promote data based on what service you’re using or who you’re connecting to. But we can stop them.

What’s Net Neutrality? Simple: your cable company shouldn’t decide where you get your news, what businesses you buy from, which video chat services and streaming services you use, or who you talk to.

Why do we need it? It used to be an unofficial rule, underlying the way the Internet was built over the years, until ISPs started to break it. For example:

  • Multiple ISPs intercepted search queries and sent them to their own portals.
  • AT&T blocked Skype on the iPhone.
  • Verizon blocked tethering apps.
  • Multiple carriers blocked Google Wallet in favor of their own payment services.

In 2015, after a public advocacy campaign, the FCC made it official: ISPs in the United States are now required to treat all traffic equally.

So what’s the problem? There’s a new chairman in charge, and he wants to remove the rule.

No doubt cable and phone companies will go back to their old tricks. Plus they could slow down access to news sites that disagree with them, or charge websites extra for the privilege of reaching their audience (when they already pay for their upload connection), or slow down services owned by competitors (consider: Verizon owns Tumblr and Flickr now, and Comcast owns NBC) in favor of their own.

Rolling back net neutrality doesn’t help you, doesn’t help business, doesn’t help anyone but the existing carriers.

That’s why we’re joining the Battle for the Net — and you can, too. The FCC’s public comment period is still open. Contact the FCC and Congress (here’s a form), and tell them why Net Neutrality matters to you. Then spread the word.

Keeping the internet open is critical. Let’s work to keep it!

Cross-posted at K-Squared Ramblings

Help Me Raise Money for Food Allergy Research

This weekend, I’m raising money for Food Allergy Research and Education through the FARE Walk for Food Allergy. Speed Force readers have helped sponsor me in the past, and I’m asking for your help again this year.

Food allergies can range from mild to life-threatening — yes, people die — and those of us on the far end of the range need to be constantly on the watch for hidden ingredients and cross-contact between foods we can eat and foods we can’t.

Photo by tamburix

Photo by tamburix (CC)

I’ve lived with a peanut allergy for my entire life. One of my earliest memories is my face swelling up because I rubbed my eyes after feeding peanuts to ducks when I was around four years old. I’ve used EpiPens on several occasions and once went to the ER for two sips of coffee with unlabeled peanuts in it. (During SDCC, making me miss an entire afternoon of the con.)

FARE funds studies to explore the causes of food allergy and develop new therapies. They run outreach programs to make it safer to visit restaurants, or just be at school or the workplace. Continue reading

DCTV Podcast Marathon for Spinal Research on June 11

DCTV Podcast Reeve Foundation

The DC TV Podcasting Network is teaming up with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to help cure spinal cord ailments on Saturday, June 11, 2016.

Founded by the late Man of Steel himself, the mission of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation is to discover and fund innovative research as well as improving the quality of life for people who live with paralysis. We here at DC TV Podcasts couldn’t be more proud to be partnering up with the Foundation for this important cause in advancing research for spinal cord injuries.

Here is how you as a listener can help and participate on Saturday, June 11, 2016, while also enjoying your favorite DC television podcasts for Arrow, The Flash, Gotham, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow as well as DC Movies. Continue reading

DC TV PODCASTS: CANCER RESEARCH FUNDRAISER ON MAY 16

dctv-emory

 

Friday, May 8, 2015 – The DC TV Podcasting Family is teaming up with Winship Cancer Institute to fight cancer on Saturday, May 16, 2015.

The Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is dedicated to the integration of innovative clinical and basic science research with outstanding patient care for the prevention, treatment and control of cancer. We here at DC TV Podcasts couldn’t be more proud to be partnering up with Winship for this very important cause.

Here is how you as a listener can help and participate on Saturday, May 16, 2015 while also enjoying your favorite DC television podcasts for Arrow, The Flash, Gotham and Supergirl.

The podcasting fundraising event will be hosted via Mixlr at mixlr.com/dctvpodcasts and will begin at 11 AM PST/2 PM EST. The event will feature the great minds of DC TV Podcasts with hosts from Quiver: The Green Arrow Podcast, The Flash Podcast, Legends of Gotham andSupergirl Radio. The event will roll from 11 AM PST/2 PM EST into the evening with all four individual shows. The marathon will then conclude with a special DC TV Podcasts Assemble show featuring hosts from all four podcasts.

Here is the following schedule for when all the live shows will begin:

Quiver Podcast at 10 AM PST (1 PM EST) – 12 PM PST (3 PM EST) with Michael Cohen and TBA host.

 

Legends of Gotham at 12 PM PST (3 PM EST) – 2 PM PST (5 PM EST) with Bill Meeks and Anne Marie DeSimone

 

The Flash Podcast at 2 PM PST (5 PM EST) – 4 PM PST (7 PM EST) with Andy Behbakht, Amy Marie and Lauren Gallaway

 

Supergirl Radio at 4 PM PST (7 PM EST) – 6 PST (9 PM EST) with Rebecca Johnson and Special Guest Michael Bailey (Host of From Crisis To Crisis: A Superman Podcast)

 

DC TV Podcasts: Assemble Show at 6 PM PST (9 PM EST) – 7 PM PST (10 PM EST) with Andy Behbakht, Michael Cohen, Rebecca Johnson, Bill Meeks, Anne Marie DeSimone and more TBA.

 

Starting today, as well as during the marathon, head over to DCTVPodcasts.com/Fundraiser to find out how you can make a donation to Winship.

We at DC TV Podcasts hope to see you in the live chat and enjoy all the exciting programming that we have in store for you. Nothing would make us happier than our listeners donating to this important and great cause and joining us at DC TV Podcasts in helping the Winship Cancer Institute continue researching ways to defeat cancer.

Any podcasts that are represented on DC TV Podcasts are fan podcasts and are not affiliated with DC Comics, Warner Bros. TV, DC Entertainment, The CW, CBS and FOX.

About Winship:

Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is located in Atlanta, Georgia. Its history dates back to 1937 and since then, it has earned a reputation of not only being a state-of-the-art facility for cancer treatment, it is also a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center, allowing for research in the areas of bone marrow transplantation, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, brain cancer, and many others. For more information, please visitwinshipcancer.emory.edu

About DC Television Podcasts:

DC TV Podcasts is a podcast circle that features a collection of high-quality and popular podcasts that are devoted to DC Comics television series including The CW’s Arrow and The Flash, FOX’s Gotham, CBS’s upcoming superhero drama Supergirl and more! Join the hosts of Quiver, The Flash Podcast, Legends of Gotham and Supergirl Radio every week for the best news, commentary and opinions about these comic book shows.

The USS…Epinephrine!? – Help Me Raise Funds for Food Allergy Research

These are the voyages of the USS Epinephrine.

This weekend I’m participating in the annual Walk for Food Allergy, and I need your help to raise funds for FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education), an organization dedicated to, well, research and education about food allergies.

Food allergies can vary in severity from mild discomfort to immediately life-threatening. We’re still trying to nail down exactly what causes them to develop, why they’re on the rise (current estimates are 15 million people in the US alone), and what can be done to stop allergic reactions from happening.

Until then, the best we can do is:

  • Avoid the foods we’re allergic to as best as we can. (This depends on industry and food preparers labeling properly and trying to avoid cross-contamination.)
  • Always carry epinephrine injectors and always plan for the possibility of a trip to the emergency room. (I had to go to the ER during SDCC last year!)

FARE funds research, provides educational resources for everyone from allergic patients to the food industry, promotes awareness of the problem, and pursues advocacy for people living with food allergies.

I’ll be walking in the September 21 event near Los Angeles. You can help by donating here. Every bit helps. Thank you!

Help Me Raise Funds for Food Allergy Research

FARE Walk for Food AllergyIf you’ve been reading Speed Force for more than a year, you’ll remember that each fall I participate in the Walk for Food Allergy. Last year, Speed Force readers helped me raise over $1000 for food allergy research, awareness, education and advocacy.

Food allergies are a serious health problem, faced by over 15 million people in the US alone. Severe anaphylactic reaction is a life-threatening emergency. Swelling can prevent breathing, a drop in blood pressure can cause loss of consciousness, and it can even trigger cardiac arrest.

Experience

I’ve experienced this first-hand. I left Comic-Con in an ambulance after two sips of flavored coffee that, unknown to the staff at the coffee shop, contained peanuts in the mix. I spent the rest of the afternoon in the emergency room.

Stuck in the ER with a Comic-Con Wristband

I was lucky. Just one week later, a thirteen-year-old died under similar circumstances: while on vacation with her family, she took a bite of something she expected would be safe but recognized the peanuts immediately. She took medication and thought the reaction was under control, only to have it hit harder half an hour later. She never even made it to the hospital.

A simple label would have been enough to prevent both of these incidents. “Mexican Mocha (contains peanuts)” or “Peanut Butter Rice Krispie Treats.”

Walking on Eggshells

We still don’t know what causes allergies, which means we can’t prevent them. The hygiene hypothesis is gaining traction, but it’s far from settled, and advice to parents as to when to introduce high-risk foods is all over the map. We can’t cure them yet, either, though desensitization treatments at starting to show some promise.

For now, those of us who live with severe allergies just have to avoid our triggers as best as we can, and carry those emergency auto-injectors everywhere.

These are the voyages of the USS Epinephrine.

If you know someone who has food allergies, you can help by knowing what’s in the food you serve, using separate utensils and dishes for preparation (if you make a PBJ with one knife, you’re going to get peanut butter in the jelly jar, making the jelly unsafe), and letting them know if you plan to substitute an ingredient.

Support FARE

You can also help by donating to FARE*, an organization dedicated to food allergy research and education. They fund research into identifying the causes of allergies and finding treatments. They provide training materials for the food industry. Over the last few years they’ve been pushing for stock epinephrine in schools, since many allergic children experience their first anaphylactic reaction at school, before they’ve even been diagnosed with an allergy. This year they’ve also been trying to combat allergy-related bullying.

Please sponsor me in the walk. Your donation will help FARE work toward long-term solutions through research and more immediate solutions through education and advocacy. If you can’t donate, but would still like to help, I’d appreciate it if you’d spread the word. Please use this link: http://hyperborea.org/allergywalk

And who knows? Maybe it’ll turn into another Superman-Flash race

Thank you for your support,
–Kelson

*FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education) is the merged organization made up of what used to be FAAN (Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network) and FAI (Food Allergy Initiative).