Tag Archives: Bart Allen

Flash Personalities: The Breakdown

Four Flashes (Flash Companion cover)

A character is more than his or her code name, costume, and power set. He’s more than his civilian job, or external circumstances. A compelling character must have a personality, and similar characters must have different personalities.

I’ve tried to distill a core personality set for each of the major Flashes at DC Comics, in a way would set them apart from each other even if you put them all in the same outfit.

Jay Garrick: The Gentleman Adventurer. In his younger days as the Flash, Jay Garrick was a bit of a practical joker, toying with the criminals whose plans he foiled. He never lost his humor, but it evolved into more of a dry wit as he began to face more challenging villains and superheroics became a lifelong career. Eventually he grew into the role of elder statesman, mentoring younger heroes and serving as an example to a new generation.

Barry Allen: The Methodical Scientist. Long before he became the Flash, Barry Allen trained as a forensic scientist. His police training means he approaches super-crime as an investigator, not just a fighter, and his scientific approach allows him to come up with new and creative ways to use his speed. He discovered time travel, vibrating through objects, creating whirlwinds, and more in his time as the Flash. Barry is also a lifelong comic book fan, who maintains his collection with the same meticulous care that he uses in the crime lab.

Wally West: Living the Dream. All his life, Wally West wanted to be a super-hero like the Flash, and once he gained super-speed, he reveled in it. Barry might have felt embarrassed by things like the Flash Museum, but Wally welcomed the attention and fame.* (Exception: When Wally’s speed was killing him, he avoided everything related to it when he could.) This lends him a bit of a temper when things don’t go his way. While he doesn’t take Barry’s experimental approach to his powers, he’s quite willing to seek out experts when he needs to, incorporating knowledge and techniques from such varied sources as Max Mercury’s zen philosophy, Johnny Quick’s speed formula, and Savitar’s knowledge of the speed force.

Bart Allen: The Impulsive One. To Bart, super-speed is normal. He’s never known anything else.  Growing up in a virtual reality left him with no sense of danger. Combine the two, and you have someone acts at the speed of thought without considering consequences. When consequences do hit (Carol’s disappearance, or the death of one of his scouts), they hit him hard. He struggles to keep himself from tearing off at the speed of light, but most of the time, he just doesn’t worry about it.

How Does it Track?

It fits quite well for all the comics and cartoons up through Flashpoint. Looking at animation: For Justice League Unlimited you drop Wally’s specific fandom for the Flash, but everything else fits. For Young Justice, you actually enhance it (he deliberately recreated Barry’s origin), and you drop the VR/danger non-sense from Bart. Jay, especially, in the Flash episodes of Batman: The Brave and the Bold.

Live action shows have changed things a bit more. The Flash TV Series from 1990 offloaded a lot of the scientific approach to Tina McGee in favor of just having Barry punch people really fast, though he did retain the detective mindset. Smallville’s version of Bart Allen was a bit more mopey, and of course skipped the origin entirely, but he still had the careless attitude more typical of Bart than the other speedsters.

As for the New 52: Barry Allen is more like his old self now than he was under Geoff Johns’ pen, but Jay Garrick and Bart Allen are different enough that I gave up trying to reconcile them and just stayed with the pre-Flashpoint versions. Bart has incorporated the haunted-past element from Smallville, though it’ll be interesting to see how much that lasts after his history is explored over the next few months. And, well, there is no New 52 Wally West yet to worry about working in.

*Nightwing once speculated that Wally West deliberately draws villains’ attention to keep them focused on himself instead of the general public.

Image: Cover of The Flash Companion.

DC Collectibles Reveals New 52 Kid Flash Action Figure

Hey Speed Readers,

Earlier this morning, DC Collectibles revealed what they had been teasing for the last week or so on their Facebook page; a trio of Teen Titans based on the New 52 designs. Superboy, Wonder Girl and Kid Flash along with many other heroes were reimagined for the New 52 2 years ago and we are just now getting figures of these designs courtesy of DC Collectibles who has seemingly kicked it into high gear when it comes to releases:

DCCNew52TTitans1 Continue reading

Speed Reading: Rogues Rebellion, Arrow & More

Some recent Flash-related articles…

Brian Buccellato talks about Villains Month, Rogues Rebellion, Forever Evil, Zero Year, and more at CBR. In addition to co-writing the main Flash series, he’s solo writing the Grodd and Rogues one-shots and the Forever Evil: Rogues Rebellion miniseries.

EW reports that Arrow is casting Barry Allen and will begin shooting the Flash’s first episode on September 30.

Scott Lobdell talks about Kid Flash’s origin at Newsarama.

Mark Waid, who has been accused by some comics retailers of trying to put them out of business with his digital comics efforts (particularly Thrillbent), has bought a comic store to prove that he’s not anti-print.

Ron Marz talks about hanging onto ideas for the right time, describing how a concept for an unused Hourman revamp in the early 1990s eventually inspired the story structure of the Velocity miniseries.

Plus a few links from early August that made it to Twitter and Facebook but somehow never made it onto the blog:

In a reprint column, Peter David rounds up a discussion on comic book villainy.

Lots of people talk to Newsarama about the Flash’s lasting appeal (including me!)

Brian Buccellato’s Top 8 Flash Rogues.

Kid Flash appears in the twelfth Who’s Who Podcast episode.

Titans Together Again…For Now…(review of Teen Titans #23)

TT Cov 23As we left the Titans last issue, Kid Flash was being pulled into a portal against his will.   Can Bart be saved or must he face a past that he doesn’t even recall?  And, now that the big battle against Trigon is out of the way for now, can the Titans heal the strained relationships in their own ranks?  That’s where we pick up in issue #23 of Teen Titans.

SOME SPOILERS AHEAD

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Flash in November: Barry in Gotham, Rogues in Rebellion, Kid Flash’s Origin

DC’s November 2013 solicitations are out, including…

Flash #25

THE FLASH #25
Written by FRANCIS MANAPUL and BRIAN BUCCELLATO
Art by CHRIS SPROUSE and KARL STORY
Cover by FRANCIS MANAPUL
1:25 B&W Variant cover by FRANCIS MANAPUL
On sale NOVEMBER 27 • 40 pg, FC, $3.99 US • RATED T

A BATMAN: ZERO YEAR tie-in! What crucial part did Barry Allen play in the Zero Year saga, and how did it shape his future as The Flash?

More after the jump. Continue reading