Tag Archives: Mark Waid

The Hero Initiative and Flash Appreciation Day

Hero Initiative

For Flash Appreciation Day, Nothing But Comics asked the Hero Initiative three questions about what they do, how you can help, and of course, the Flash:

1. For readers that may be unfamiliar with the Hero Initiative, can you tell us how the organization helps comics creators?

Long story short, we’re a medical and financial relief organization for comic book creators. We’ve literally kept people alive. There was a moment at the San Diego con a few years ago that was surreal for me. An artist that we benefited came up to me to thank me for the help we had given him. He was shaking my hand, with tears streaming down his cheeks. He had been living on about $90 a week, and was eating one meal a day. He didn’t know what to do, or where to turn, and he was ready to take his own life. He had literally written the suicide note when he stumbled upon us. We were able to get him back on his feet, and he’s alive today, doing much better.

We’ve literally paid back rent when people were 48 hours from being evicted, paid electric bills when people were 24 hours from having utilities shut off, and paid for desperately needed operations that weren’t covered by medical insurance as well.


2. How can people help the Hero Initiative?  Besides financial contributions, are there any resources or activities that might be helpful to the organization?

I always tell people, “Five bucks.” Is the easiest and best thing people can do. People can donate via the “What Can I Do?” page on our Website.

We also need volunteers for events and conventions to help us staff these events. Folks can find information on the same page.


3. Since it’s Flash Appreciation Day, I’d like to ask the Hero Initiative team if you have a favorite iteration of the Flash character (Jay Garrick, Barry Allen, Wally West, or Bart Allen)?

Here’s what some members of our Board of Directors had to say:

George Pérez, former Teen Titans writer, artist:

Barry was always MY  Flash. He’s the one I grew up with and there is something a bit poignant about being the artist who “killed” him back in the ’80s. Since I was drawing Wally as a member of the New Teen Titans, he will always be Kid Flash to me.

Mark Waid, former writer Flash:

How could it not be Wally West? Here’s my resume: Jay was stately, Barry was solid. But Wally was fun.

Walt Simonson, Ragnarok writer/artist:

Tossup between Jay Garrick and Barry Allen, giving Barry a slight edge.  He’s the character I read when I was young, so he’ll always be the Flash to me.  However, I was around when Jay Garrick was reintroduced into the DCU, and I have to say that as a kid reading the books,  I thought it very cool that a second mature Flash with gray temples had appeared.

Jim Valentino, Image Comics co-founder:

Jay Garrick. I read Flash #123 when I was about 10 and just loved the character. Simple, homespun. Everything from his personality on down to his costume–a red jersey, dungarees and doughboy hat with wings. It looked homemade, like something anyone could wear without getting embarrassed. The most likable character in the JSA, the heart of the team.

Dennis O’Neil, longtime comics writer and editor:

I guess I’d go with Barry, but I confess to a warm spot in my heart for Jay because he was one of the first superheroes I encountered.  (Hey, I was really, really young. Really!)


There you have it: A run-down of what the Hero Initiative does, plus a few Flash-y thoughts. Please take a look at how you can help by donating, volunteering, or participating in other programs that can help the charity.

Flash by Mark Waid Collection Finally in the Works

Flash #62: Born to Run Part 1DC Comics has been releasing collections of the Geoff Johns and Morrison/Millar runs on the Wally West Flash series, but the classic stories by Mark Waid have been out of print for years. (They are available digitally, though.) That will FINALLY change toward the end of the year. Lee Hiley spotted an Amazon listing for a paperback collection of Flash by Mark Waid Book One, scheduled for September 13, 2016.

It’s clearly just a placeholder — there’s no cover, description, or page count, so we can only speculate as to what might be included. The recent Flash By Geoff Johns Book One covered 13 regular issues plus three longer specials, so let’s figure on around 15-16 issues’ worth.

Flash #62-65: “Born to Run,” the four-part retelling of Wally West’s origin and his first summer as Kid Flash, is a safe bet.

Flash #66 is an Aquaman quest spot.

Flash #67-68 feature a new take on Abra Kadabra’s origin, as the Flash follows him to his home era.

Flash #69-70 and Green Lantern #30-31 have Wally West and Hal Jordan teaming up against Hector Hammond and Gorilla Grodd for “Gorilla Warfare.”

Flash #71-72 are a Dr. Alchemy story, looking at what happens when a new villain gets his hands on the Philosopher’s Stone.

Flash #73 features Jay Garrick’s return to the recurring cast, after the Justice Society was brought back from an editorially-imposed limbo. There’s also a Christmas get-together with a surprising guest at the very end of the issue as a cliffhanger.

That’s twelve issues (not counting the Green Lantern half of “Gorilla Warfare”), and #74 starts off the epic “Return of Barry Allen” (Flash #74-79). They might add six more issues, but I think it’s more likely that they’ll stop at #72 or #73 and fit in two annuals:

Flash Annual 4 (1991) is a tie-in to “Armageddon 2001” and looks at a possible future in which Wally West has spent years retired in the Witness Protection Program. When one of his old enemies finds him, they kidnap his son, forcing him out into the open.

Flash Annual 5 (1992) ties into “Eclipso: The Darkness Within.” Golden Glider recruits three other Rogues to rob a museum and they all double-cross each other. The gem she wants to steal drags them into the larger story running through that summer’s annuals.

THE FLASH Ep 2.11 (Review)

NOTE: This review is being posted prior to THE FLASH showing in the Pacific Time Zone USA. If you haven’t seen the show yet, you may want to come back later after viewing the episode.

Long time Flash fans will recall a storyline from the early 1990’s called “The Return of Barry Allen”. This was a classic Mark Waid tale about the supposed re-emergence of Barry in the Wally West Flash time line. Why do I bring it up here, in a review of THE FLASH tv show? Well…follow us after the jump and all will be made clear…


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Interview with Mark Waid at HeroesCon 2014!

We talked with writer, publisher and comic shop owner Mark Waid at HeroesCon 2014 on behalf of TMStash and Speedforce.org about Thrillbent Comics (check it out!), the continuation of EMPIRE at Thrillbent, his take on THE FLASH (including both his take on the New52 Wally West and his comments about the name of the Speed Force itself), Foggy’s health issues in DAREDEVIL and more!  Don’t miss this interview with Mark Waid (just click on the link below)!

Just a note for Flash fans who cannot wait for the Flash-related questions, they start at 3:23…but honestly you should catch the whole thing…and don’t forget to check out Thrillbent.com!

Mark Waid, Empire vol.2, and the Flash TV Show

Two quick updates on Mark Waid, who wrote Wally West’s adventures as The Flash for about 100 issues and almost the entire decade of the 1990s.

1. He’s seen the Flash TV pilot, and thinks it’s great.

Replying to Greg Berlanti:

Empire2. Waid and Barry Kitson’s Empire vol.2 launches next week on Thrillbent. The original miniseries told the story of what happens after when the world’s greatest super-villain conquers the planet. What’s left? The description for volume 2:

But where is his strength coming from? The sole loyalist who kept him anchored to humanity is one year gone, and on the anniversary of Golgoth’s loss, several seemingly coordinated new threats are surfacing around the globe. Each presents its own unique threat to the throne, and if Golgoth wants to maintain the crown, he will have to divide his forces–and his attentions–in dangerous new ways.

The out-of-print Empire volume 1 will also be available on Thrillbent as part of the all-you-can-read $3.99 monthly subscription for the entire catalog.

Flash Fact: Long Beach Comic & Horror Con 2013

Mark Waid at LBCHC 2013I spent Saturday at Long Beach Comic and Horror Con, which despite its name is still, five years on, one of the most comics-focused “comic con” events I’ve been to. Among other things, I caught the Young Justice Voice Acting panel with a dozen cast members and Greg Weisman, a discussion panel between Marv Wolfman and Scott Lobdell and a spotlight on Mark Waid (see photo). Wolfman and Waid are always fascinating, and Lobdell turned out to be really interesting as well. Brian Buccellato was supposed to be there as well, but I never saw him. Artist’s Alley was huge, though, and I never quite managed to do the full systematic pass that I intended, so it’s entirely possible that all my trips through the area missed him.

Some interesting Flash-related bits:

Jason Spisak, when asked about getting into his character, remarked that Wally West’s lines in the script always look like he’s a “total douche,” but what he had to do was think: His friends keep him around. There’s got to be something endearing to him that they want to have around. He’d find that and make it come through in his acting.

Speaking of Young Justice, the game studio that did Young Justice: Legacy still has the license. If the game does well enough, they’d like to do a sequel…set during what would have been season three.

Young Justice Cast at LBCHC 2013
Mark Waid, when asked what story felt like he’d finally made it, said “The Return of Barry Allen.” That’s interesting, since the story was about Wally West reaching the point where he felt like he’d finally made it. He also said that his record at making good cliffhangers is due to the fact that he writes them before figuring out how the character’s going to get out (which makes for a few stressful days at the beginning of the next script). If he doesn’t know how, the audience isn’t going to guess!

Scott Lobdell compares the New 52 Kid Flash’s personality to Woody Woodpecker.

Check out my full write-up at K-Squared Ramblings or go straight to the photos.